The pressure on leaders to deliver quarterly results is greater than ever. Many argue that they have no choice but to cave to the demands to boost profits quarter after quarter. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Most of the pressure stems from company's boards, and sometimes executive team. In other words, some of the short-term thinking we’re seeing is self-imposed, with CEOs merely getting in their own way.

Given this, you could argue that CEOs shouldn’t be putting so much pressure on themselves or their teams to get strong short-term results that in many cases doesn’t reward shareholders in the long term.

Going long is not an easy task, but it can be done. And the stakes are too high not to try.


Inspired by: Harvard Business Review - Why CEOs Should Push Back Against Short-Termism, by Dennis Carey, Brian Dumaine, Michael Useem, and Rodney Zemmel